Bracelet Portugal Tiles Azulejos Antique Talavera History - 8 Tiles Gift Boxed - for a medium or large wrist OOAK

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This Bracelet is certainly a statement piece! It is stretchy and will fit a medium or large wrist. One of a kind piece! These tiles are found on homes, churches, convents and monasteries throughout the country.

All my tiles are replicas made of polymer clay where the image actually becomes part of the clay through baking. No glue is used in the process. The pieces become waterproof and scratch resistant. Due to the handmade and hand shaped nature of each tile, slight variations will occur, as no two pieces are alike.

Wear a Piece of History!

According to the World Heritage Convention:

This museum-city, whose roots go back to Roman times, reached its golden age in the 15th century, when it became the residence of the Portuguese kings. Its unique quality stems from the whitewashed houses decorated with azulejos and wrought-iron balconies dating from the 16th to the 18th century. The Historic Centre of Évora, capital of the Alentejo Province, Portugal, has been shaped by more than twenty centuries of history, going as far back as Celtic times. It fell under Roman domination and still retains, among other ruins, those of the Temple of Diana. During the Visigoth period, the Christian city occupied the surface area surrounded by the Roman wall, which was then reworked. Under Moorish domination, which came to an end in 1165, further improvements were made to the original defensive system as shown by a fortified gate and the remains of the ancient Kasbah. There are a number of buildings from the medieval period, the best known of which is the Cathedral that was completed in the 13th century. But it was in the 15th century, when the Portuguese kings began living in Évora on an increasingly regular basis that Évora’s golden age began. At that time, convents and royal palaces sprung up everywhere: St Claire Convent, the royal church and convent of São Francisco, not far from the royal palace of the same name, and Os Lóios Convent with the São João Evangelista Church. These are remarkable monuments that were either entirely new buildings or else constructed within already existing establishments, and which are characterised by the Manueline style that survived in the major creations of the 16th century.
When the University of the Holy Spirit, where the Jesuits taught from 1553 onwards, was established, Évora became Portugal’s second city. However, the university’s rapid decline began following the expulsion of the Company of Jesus by minister Marquis of Pombal, in 1759.
Évora is also remarkable for reasons other than its monumental heritage related to significant historic events. The 16th century was a time of major urban planning and great intellectual and religious influence. While Évora also has many noteworthy 16th-century patrician houses (Cordovil house, the house of Garcia de Resende), the unique quality of the city arises from the coherence of the minor architecture of the 16th, 17th and 18th centuries. This unity finds its overall expression in the form of numerous low whitewashed houses, decorated with Dutch tiles and wrought-iron balconies and covered with tile roofs or terraces which line narrow streets of medieval configuration and which in other areas bears witness to the concentric growth of the town until the 17th century. It also served to strengthen the fundamental unity of a type of architecture that is perfectly adapted to the climate and the location.
Évora remained mainly undamaged by the great earthquake of 1755 that destroyed many towns in Portugal, including Lisbon. The monuments of the Historic Centre of Évora bear witness to their profound influence on Portuguese architecture in Brazil.


According to Wikipedia: Peso da Régua was inhabited by Roman and barbarian invasions during the early part of the settled history. Its name, as historians have suggested, developed from a few places: first, the name Vila Reggula a Roman estate that at one time existed near the historic centre; others suggest it originated from the word récua (the ships that plied the waters along the Douro); or derived the word reguengo (a designation for lands that were attributed to the monarchy).[3] Peso da Régua may also have its origin in the word regra (English: rule), alluding to the hereditary rights of descendents achieved through forals.[3] This theory is based on the donated of lands by Counts Henrique and Hugo in 1093, which were transferred to Egas Moniz.[3] It is likely that this rule gave origin to the word Régoa, and later Régua.[3] In relation to the first word, Peso, there are two opinions on its origin: the first, defends the it was derived from the place where the weighing of goods existed, or where taxes were levied; or, secondly, that the word was probably used to define the placed where animals were fed (Portuguese: pensado), or Penso.[3]
Middle Ages[edit]
Peso de Régua received its foral from King Sancho I, who conferred on the locality of Godim the municipal charter.[3]
On 3 February 1837, Peso da Régua was elevated to the status of vila (English: town), which included the annexed municipality of Godim, the civil parishes of Godim, Loureiro, Fontelas, Moura Morta and Sedielos.[3]
Its important role as municipality only achieved its zenith in 1836, after the Marquess of Pombal designated the Douro, its vineyards and wine, as a quality brand for export.[3] This was helped through the creation of Companhia Geral das Vinhas do Alto Douro, in 1756, which delimited the vineyards of the Douro Valley by granite markers (Portuguese: Marcos de Feitora) to regulate the vineyards and wines produced. After this point, through commercialization and centralization, Régoa began to become the centre of the region.[3]
On 31 December 1859, due to the extinction of the municipality of Canelas, the parishes of Poiares, Covelinhas, Vilarinho de Freires and Galafura were added to the municipality.[3]
Republic[edit]
On 11 December 1933, the parish of Vinhos was created from the de-annexed region of Sedielos, resulting in a municipality of eleven parishes threaded along the Douro.[3]
Within the integration of Canelas, in 1976, the municipality grew to twelve.[3]
Peso da Régua was elevated to city on 14 August 1985.[3]
In 1988, the Office Internacional de la Vigne et du Vin recognized the municipality as the Cidade Internacional da Vinha e do Vinho (English: International City of Vine and Wine).[3]



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Thank you,
Atrio

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Shipping from United States

I ship from the USA. All orders are sent using USPS 1st class mail which takes from 2 to 5 working days. All Packages are sent with Delivery Confirmations Numbers so that seller and buyer can track their shipment.
International packages will also be sent 1st class and will take from 5 to 10 working days. International Packages do not have tracking or insurance once they leave the USA. There is a shipping upgrade for "International Priority Mail" for those who would like tracking information. Seller is not responsible for lost or damaged items. Seller is not responsible for customs or VAT duties on international orders.

Refunds

If you are not happy with your item, I will refund the cost (minus shipping) upon receipt. I can accept returns up to 30 days from date of the order, as long as item is returned in its original, unused condition and packaging.
If there is a defect with the item, please contact me so that I can help you. We do not accept exchanges.
Seller is not responsible for items lost or damaged in shipping.
Unfortunately, I can not accept the return of personalized orders. Some pieces, like Chandelier Earrings, will be shipped with a tag. These pieces can only be returned if the tag REMAINS INTACT. Please note that there is a 5% RESTOCKING fee on all items.

Additional

Yes, I do take custom orders. Please just contact me.

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